Woof Woof stays at the The Graduate Hotel in Tempe, Arizona

 

graduatehotelThe Graduate is a few minutes from downtown Phoenix. Woof Woof happened upon this hotel by accident because I was there for a conference that was at the hotel. Sometimes which pet friendly hotel we choose is simply about convenience, but we lucked out with this one.

Woof Woof always appreciates rooms with yard access. Thus, one of the first things he noticed was the sliding glass door. Several rooms on the bottom floor of the hotel have direct grass access. The yard is semi-private with a large cement wall behind it. The only problem is there is ungated access to the parking lot and the pool. Being on leash in this area is definitely a safety preference.

The other perk of this hotel is that the rooftop used for private parties is dog friendly as are the outdoor areas of the restaurant. He ate outside at The Normal Diner. On vacation, dog food is his secondary food source. I ordered him a kid’s meal with sliced tomatoes instead of fries and no mayo on the bun. The server happily accommodated him and gave him a bowl of water as well.

Woof Woof is a big fan of bread and only gets it as a treat. So he was thrilled to have a homemade bun on his burger. He’s not a lettuce fan, so we skipped the lettuce. Onions also were excluded.

graduatehoteltempeThe bed itself was approved by Woof Woof. However, the height was an obstacle. He did have to ask to be lifted on to the bed. Luckily, for me, he’s only 16 pounds. Once on the bed, he was impressed with the variety of decorative and traditional pillows. He tried each one out and ultimately chose a combination of decorative a standard pillow as his bed top dog bed.

The pet fee is $25 per day plus a $100 refundable deposit, but it’s waived for service dogs and is well worth it. Yard access and good food service is definitely a plus.

Woof Woof Travels
Woof Woof, a 6-month mini schnauzer, is our official travel blogger. He travels the world reviewing hotels, restaurants and his experiences. Check out his columns every Wednesday. The column is co-written by his dog parent, travel writer Reyna Gobel. Her travel articles have published in Costco Connection, Southwest Spirit, American Way, and Hemispheres.

Woof Woof Goes Off Leash in NYC

 

woofwoofparkIf Woof Woof had one wish, it would to always have time to play off leash. Luckily for him, New York dogs and dogs visiting New York, there are dozens of possibilities for dogs to run free. Each park offers its own experience.

Prospect Park in Brooklyn has acres for dogs to play but also has a dog beach for canines to jump in and go for a swim year round. However, in New York winters your dog may not be thrilled with the temperature. Woof Woof just dips his front paws in and not in the winter.

All dogs and owners interested in history should visit Ft. Greene Park in Brooklyn. In the middle of the park is a monument and tomb to Navy martyrs from the 1800s. The base is open to learn about history and is completely dog friendly. You can bring your dog on leash anytime, but you can go to the park off leash before 9a or after 9p. As with most parks with off leash hours, you can generally find 50 other dogs for your dog to play with. At night, you’ll want to have an LED glow collar. Woof Woof bought his on Amazon for about $10.

Then there’s Central Park. Most humans would say no one really explored NYC without a visit to Central Park in Manhattan. Dogs are offered guided tours called Hound Hikes with their owners and there are 23 areas to run free, climb on rocks and check out the pounds and bridges. To go on the guided hiking tours, you have to be a member, which is $50. There are also Bagel Barks, events with breakfast for owners. To learn more about Central Park Dog Events visit Central Park Paws.

One caution for bringing your dogs to New York, be warry of what’s on the street. There are strange people that throw chicken bones everywhere. It’s bane of every dog owner’s existence to constantly tell their dog’s to either leave the bones on the ground. While chicken bones should be taken away, sticks should not. Nothing makes dogs happier than finding a stick in the park. It’s a readily available treasurer that makes every dog feel like the best toy hunter that ever existed.woofwoofdogpark

Woof Woof Travels
Woof Woof, a 6-month mini schnauzer, is our official travel blogger. He travels the world reviewing hotels, restaurants and his experiences. Check out his columns every Wednesday. The column is co-written by his dog parent, travel writer Reyna Gobel. Her travel articles have published in Costco Connection, Southwest Spirit, American Way, and Hemispheres.

Woof Woof Learns How to Wear Boots

When you’re a dog born to travel, boots are essential for so many activities from hiking to walking on salt covered snowy streets and sidewalks in the winter. So Woof Woof was very fortunate that Ruffwear sent him all weather boots for his journeys.

woofwoofbootsHowever, getting him to wear them is another story. So before he takes his next trip, we followed as many tips as possible for getting Woof Woof to wear them.

Here are five tips for getting your dog to wear boots:

1.     Ruffwear tip: Don’t laugh. This may be difficult, but laughing is likely to cause your dog further anxiety.

Woof Woof and I’s experience: I stayed calm while he got used to new foot clothing.

2.     Ruffwear tip: Engage your dog. Immediately engage your dog in their favorite activity to distract them from the boots.  For example, a walk, a trick, or fetch with their favorite toy.  Eventually, if you are consistent, they will associate the boots with this activity and will have a positive reaction when the boots come out.

Woof Woof and I’s experience: I kept treats next to me. It came in handy when he tried to get up. I told him to sit. Gave him a treat. Then he was ready for boot wearing.

3.     Ruffwear Tip: Break in the boots. Dogs will need to build up a tolerance to the boots just like human shoes.  Take your dog for short walks prior to your first long adventure with the boots.

Woof Woof and I’s experience: I let him walk around the house first. I’ll take him on short walks I them before hiking or snowy walks this winter. Boots take practice.

4.     Make sure the boots fit. Measure your dog’s paw width (front and back) carefully prior to purchasing the boots.  A good fit maximizes comfort and will ensure the boots stay on the paws through rigorous exercise.  Many of our customers are surprised to find out that a 100 pound dog can actually fit any size from  X-Small to Large, so don’t assume you know your dogs foot size. Overall dog size doesn’t translate to paw and boot size.  Click here for more sizing instruction.

Woof Woof and I’s experience: He as big paws for his size. It was good we measured. To make the try on experience comfortable, I made sure I opened the top enough for is paw to easily step in.

5.       Use boot liners. Boot liners will not only enhance the fit of the boots, they will help keep your dog comfortable by softening any potential abrasion spots, insulating the boot, and wicking moisture away from the paw.

Woof Woof and I’s experience: We haven’t used bootliners yet, but it’s essentially the same as socks for humans. Boots are always more comfortable for me with socks. So Woof Woof and I agree.

Woof Woof Travels
Woof Woof, a 6-month mini schnauzer, is our official travel blogger. He travels the world reviewing hotels, restaurants and his experiences. Check out his columns every Wednesday. The column is co-written by his dog parent, travel writer Reyna Gobel. Her travel articles have published in Costco Connection, Southwest Spirit, American Way, and Hemispheres.

Woof Woof Reviews the Minneapolis Airport’s Dog Relief Area

Woof Woof had an hour layover, and I felt he needed a bathroom break after getting a McDonald’s cheeseburger patty for lunch. We found the pet relief area that was in a shared room with nursing mothers. The pet portion was a room that couldn’t have been more than 8 feet by 8 feet. It had artificial grass and a fire hydrant. The grass was wet, presumably from the flush cleaning feature. Woof Woof stepped in the room, sniffed around, and then decided against peeing in that area. I think he just didn’t like artificial grass. He disliked the Minneapolis relief area so much that he preferred waiting another 3.5 hours until he exited the Phoenix airport to use the bathroom. There were two other facilities, but they were outside the secured area.

More info on the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport pet and service animal relief areas

Woof Woof Travels
Woof Woof, a 6-month mini schnauzer, is our official travel blogger. He travels the world reviewing hotels, restaurants and his experiences. Check out his columns every Wednesday. The column is co-written by his dog parent, travel writer Reyna Gobel. Her travel articles have published in Costco Connection, Southwest Spirit, American Way, and Hemispheres.